Kiwanian Receives Dunlap Award

By Kiwanis Club of Carmichael  |  2018-03-16

Len Ohlendorf and Wayne Lang. Photo courtesy Kiwanis Club of Carmichael

CARMICHAEL, CA (MPG) - Kiwanis Club of Carmichael member Len Ohlendorf received the prestigious William A. Dunlap Fellowship Award to recognize and celebrate his service to the community, the Kiwanis Club and to the positive elements of Kiwanis.  Len continues to demonstrate dedication to community service and provides inspirational and innovative leadership of the club.  Len has served as the club president, committee chairman, advisor to the Key Club and various other positions.  As membership Chairman, Len implemented strategies leading to seventeen new members last year.  Current Club President Wayne Lang says, “He is a dynamo of enthusiasm, fun, and commitment.  Len is a sterling example of the positive force of Kiwanis in serving the children of our community.”

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Bright Shining Stars

Story and photos by Jacqueline Fox  |  2018-03-16

Third from left, front row, Janice Wagaman, Volunteer Director, Front Street Animal Shelter and 2018 Outstanding Volunteer Coordinator of the year joins members of the board of directors from DOVIA.

DOVIA Annual Awards Shines a Light on Outstanding Volunteers

SACRAMENTO COUNTY, CA (MPG) - How do you inspire a team of volunteers not to roll their eyes when asked to do perhaps the most humble of tasks - scooping up dog waste?

With a lot of patience and a willingness to meet them where they are at, says Janice Wagaman, who was selected by the Directors of Volunteers in Agencies (DOVIA) March 8 as the agency’s 2018 Outstanding Volunteer Coordinator of the Year.  

DOVIA Sacramento is a non-profit organization providing support, workshops and trainings for professional volunteer managers at agencies across the county.

For the last five and a half years, Wagaman has served as the director of volunteers at the Front Street Animal Shelter in Sacramento.  Wagaman is tasked with the job of overseeing roughly 2,400 volunteers at the shelter, which range from high school students to elderly adults with retirement time on their hands - all of whom come in with various levels of passion and commitment for service and, of course, an unwavering dedication to helping animals.

“It’s a tough job, lots of passion there, and often it is very emotional,” said Wagaman.  “But I absolutely would not have any other job in the world,” said Wagaman.  “In my case, one of the biggest challenges is inspiring new volunteers who are starting out at the first level to understand the importance of some of the more menial tasks we have to get done, which is go and pick up poop.  And the other challenge is that, with so many people and so many different levels of compassion and passion for being of service at the shelter, I don’t always have the time I would like to have to get to know all of my volunteers on a personal level.”

Under her directorship, Wagaman has created a new volunteer program called “SMART (Sacramento Missing Animal Response Team) Pet Alert, which has played an instrumental role in helping to boost the number of the shelter’s lost animals who are returned to their owners from 23 percent to nearly 30 percent. 

“My volunteers are really pushing this at an amazing level,” said Wagaman, one of three volunteers nominated for the award. “They are using social media aps and programs, like Next Door and Facebook to help reconnect lost animals with their owners and it is having a huge impact.  I’m super proud of them and this program.”

In addition, the shelter’s overall “Leave Live Rate” under Wagaman’s direction is at 87 percent - that means 87 percent of the animals brought in to the shelter due to separation from their owners, abandonment or other reasons, are being rehomed each year.

“That’s a good number,” said Wagaman.  “Of course, we’d love to see 100 percent, but we are proud and always working toward the goal.”

The annual awards also include recognition for Outstanding Youth Volunteers.  Taking that award for 2018 was Janae Bonnell, 18, a senior at Oak Ridge High School in El Dorado Hills.  Bonnell has worked as a volunteer at Shriners Hospital for Children in Sacramento since 2016.  One of 14 young volunteers nominated for the 2018 award, she plans on a career in pre-med.  She has clocked hundreds of hours as a volunteer working in, among other places, the hospital’s pre-operation unit, post-anesthesia care unit, operating rooms and admissions department.

“Really, this is amazing, but I am very impressed with all of the other nominees who are volunteering out there like me,” said Bonnell, as she posed for photos alongside her parents and sister.  “I love working with people and of course being at Shriners gives me valuable experience that goes along with what I want to do, which is pre-med.”

Bonnell took home a scholarship for $500 as part of her award.

Included among the list of nominees for the Outstanding Youth Volunteers is Carmichael resident and El Camino High School senior, Konark Mangudkar, honored for his volunteer work at Eskaton Village Carmichael since 2016.  He is interested in a career in neuroscience and technology and has an infinity for working with seniors and in the arena of memory care.

“I get a lot out of working with the elderly, especially those with memory loss issues,” said Mangudkar.  “I know they often don’t know who I am, but sometimes they do. It’s a very rewarding place to help out.  I know I am getting more out of this than I expected at first.”

The other nominees in the Outstanding Youth Volunteers category were Ivori White, with the Sacramento Public Library, North Natomas branch; Adrian McCauley, Sacramento Public Library; Rachel Neches, Reading Partners Sacramento; Cassandra Ng, City of Sacramento Volunteer Program; Cassidy Schreiner Girl Scouts, Friends of Meals on Wheels; Jihad “Gigi” Hamid, Sacramento Public Library, Arden Dimick; Cecilia Uribe-Smith, Sacramento Public Library-Arden Dimick; Celio Gonzalez, Sacramento Public Library, Galt; Isabel Nguyen, Kaiser South Sacramento; Hadley Nevin, Fairytale Town; Isabel Gatdula, Angelique Ashby’s Youth Action Corps and Emily Chin-Ito, ACC Senior Services.

The two other nominees for Outstanding Volunteer Coordinators adult category are Jordon Powell, American River Parkway Foundation and Katie Curler, Alzheimer’s Association.

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SACRAMENTO, CA (MPG) - A two-year criminal investigation by the California Highway Patrol, Valley Division Investigative Services Unit, culminated yesterday in the arrests of five employees from Sacramento County-based Davis Tow Incorporated (Davis Tow), which included the owners. 

The investigation revealed Davis Tow developed business practices that involved the illegal towing of vehicles from commercial properties in the area of Sleep Train Arena in order to profit from the towing and impound fees. 

Davis Tow routinely failed to properly report private property tows resulting in increased storage fees and often the lien sale of the vehicles at a profit to Davis Tow.  Each of the individuals listed below were arrested and charged with 29 counts of auto theft (10851(a) V.C.) and one count of conspiracy to commit a crime (182(a)(1) P.C.).  Bail for each person has been set at $1,000,000. 


Scott Gordon Davis, 54 – Placerville                                                        

Christopher Gerald Davis, 46 – Antelope                                                                

Leslie James McKenzie, 50 – Chico                                                            


Andrew Robert Harless, 30 – Homewood

Erik Steven Dyer, 37 – Elverta                      

The investigation thus far has identified more than 250 victims resulting in approximately $100,000 in damages.  If you feel that you have been a victim of an unlawfully towed vehicle by Davis Tow, please go to, where you can complete an incident report or call the California Highway Patrol at (916) 731-6431.


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Wildlife Care Association's Bloom Boom Flower Power Planting Event Has Been Rained Out

By Rick Reed  |  2018-03-15

SACRAMENTO, CA (MPG) - The Wildlife Care Association Bloom Boom Flower Power planting event set for Saturday March 17th has been rained out. Standing water, muddy soil and more rain forecast will make tilling and planting impossible.

The event is now rescheduled for Saturday, April 14th 12pm – 4 pm at Wildlife Care Association, 5211 Patrol Road, McClellan Park.

Wildlife Care Association of Sacramento is engaging ‘flower power’ to brighten the non-profit’s rehabilitation facility at McClellan Park. The state’s second largest volunteer wildlife rehab group is transforming the old USAF Radar dome it now calls home with the bright faces of sunflowers!

Volunteers are needed to help plant a sunflower garden with assistance from Woodland’s Dr. Tom Heaton, creator of fabulous hybrid sunflower seeds. His company Sunflower Selections will provide seed for their newest creation in White Sunflower hybrids and Yellow varieties to provide seeds for wildlife. Led by Sacramento’s own garden star, Plant Lady Marlene Simon and volunteer’s will create a sunflower line garden in a day!

The event is now set for Saturday April 14th and volunteers are needed to help create a burst of color with flower power. to take part in the Bloom Boom event this April.

If you find wildlife in distress call 916-965-WILD for help.

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SACRAMENT REGION, CA (MPG) - WHAT: As Toys “R” Us announces the closure of 800 U.S. stores affecting as many as 33,000 jobs, Thunder Valley Casino Resort seeks to immediately hire qualified Toys “R” Us employees at a Job Fair on Saturday, March 17 from 9 a.m. to 12 p.m.

“We have immediate openings for qualified candidates, with opportunities to advance,” said Debi Fetzner, Vice President of Human Resources. “Thunder Valley is one of the area’s premier places to work, with great benefits and supportive team environment. We look forward to meeting anyone interested in learning more about a career in the hospitality industry.”

Benefits for full-time employees include medical, dental, vision, and vacation. All Thunder Valley employees enjoy free parking, one free meal per shift, 401k matching funds, leadership development training, opportunity to advance, free health and wellness counseling, reward incentives, and discounts at Thunder Valley including 30% off at the Spa and Gift Shop, 10% off at restaurants and discounts for select concerts.

Candidates must be at least 18 years of age and successfully pass a drug and background check in order to work at Thunder Valley. To work in positions on the casino floor, candidates must be 21 years of age.

All candidates must be able to work weekends and holidays. Please apply online at before attending the job fair.

WHEN:          Saturday, March 17    

9 a.m. to 12 p.m. 

WHERE:       Thunder Valley Casino Resort    

Employment Center

1200 Athens Avenue

Lincoln, CA 95648



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Annual Roseville Gem Show Rocks On for 2018

By MPG Staff  |  2018-03-15

Featured (above) a budding “rockhound” under supervision as she delicately sorts through a tray of semi -precious stones during the Gem Hunt event during the Gem Show. Photo courtesy Roseville Rock Rollers.

SACRAMENTO REGION, CA (MPG) - Roseville Rock Rollers 56th Annual Gem, Jewelry, Fossil, and Mineral Show will take place at the Placer County Fairgrounds in Roseville March 24-25. Hosted by the Roseville Rock Rollers, also known as the Roseville Gem and Mineral Society, this year’s show features gemstones, jewelry, fossils and minerals and has something for the whole family.

The group was established in 1960 as a group of local “rockhounds,” according to show chair James Hutchings. That group, deeply interested in the science and art of the earths' natural beauty in rocks and minerals, first met in homes and then as their numbers grew, expanded to the use of a local school room.

This year’s show has dozens of exhibits for attendees, such as jewelry, metal, wire and glass beading arts, fossils, crystals and minerals, but that’s not all. So that attendees aren’t rushed, the show also provides a cafeteria. “A very fine hot lunch is available at our own kitchen in Johnson Hall,” states Hutchings. The group has put together a menu of very reasonably priced food and beverages will also be available at the show’s cafeteria.

In addition to exhibits, classes and demonstrations, show goers can pan for gold, purchase equipment, buy raffle tickets, have rocks, gems and mineral identified by experts or make purchases at a silent auction.

Wishing to share the art and science of the mineral world, in the tradition of gem and mineral shows around the world, the Roseville Rock Rollers established their own gem and mineral show around 1962. The society grew, the show grew, and the show and the Society moved to the Placer County Fairgrounds where it continues today.

“As the Roseville Gem and Mineral Society has expanded, the show expanded to support the costs associated with its programs, such as the Rookie Rock Rollers, juniors program, the Annual Scholarship program to Geology Students at Sacramento State Geology Department, and our year round Lapidary shop on the fairgrounds,” said Hutchings. “The lapidary shop on the Fair Grounds is the heart and soul of our Society, where we teach lapidary arts, jewelry fabrication, conduct mineral identification and mini tail gate rock sales.”

Hutchings developed his love for “rockhounding” at an early age. “Personally, I as most young people, was fascinated with rocks minerals and crystals. My parents encouraged me with my first Golden Book of Rocks and Minerals, a book still in current print, and my first rock pick.”

At the age of 38, he became seriously interested in rockhounding and gold mining, attending a mineral identification course at Sierra College, next pursuing an in depth understanding the chemistry and physics that form “these miracles in the earth.” He has put that knowledge to good use today providing what he refers to as a “mini lab” during the show to test rocks, minerals, and gems to provide guest an idea of materials they have in their possession.

While the Rock Rollers must generate funds to keep their programs operating, the primary purpose of any Gem and Mineral Show is to promote the Art and Science of the mineral world, according to Hutchings.

Like many of the group members, an early exposure to rockhounding and lapidary arts often provides a genesis of interest that often blossoms later in life, Hutchings said. “We really work hard, to attract the parents who want to expose their children to the natural world and foster that spark.”

There are presentations and activities for youngsters on identifying and handling specimens of all kinds. Students and Scouts can reinforce their California Rock Cycle curriculum and merit badge information. Scouts can have their mineral finds evaluated for rock type or mineral and validated for their required collection.

Hutchings suggests visitors come early and plan on spending the day at the show. “We take over the entire fairgrounds with exhibits, demonstrators, and vendors.” 

Not to be missed are real treasures the group will have on display. “Folks tend to walk by the display cases,” he said. “These simple, well lighted boxes contain the best of the best of personal collections of minerals in variety or by theme. The displays are, ‘literally’ miniature museums showcasing specimens in the possession of individuals who have spent a lifetime collecting the best of the best of their favorite species of rock or mineral,” said Hutchings.

“We are looking for the general public who are looking for gem stones, set and unset, handmade, and fine art jewelry, and mineral specimens from every corner of the world! We find the single most striking comment from folks who, by accident, end up at our show is, “I had no idea such things existed in the world!’’

For more information, tickets and coupons, visit the group’s website at

Contributed by James Hutchings, Roseville Rock Rollers Show Chair


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Trump: Gov. Brown Doing “Very Poor Job” Running State

Rich Peters, MPG Editor  |  2018-03-14

President Donald Trump expressed his feelings towards Governor Jerry Brown during his California visit.

SACRAMENTO REGION, CA (MPG) - President Donald Trump visited the great state of California to inspect border types near San Diego on Tuesday. He took time out of his visit to express his feelings regarding Governor Jerry Brown’s lack of control over the state.

“Governor Brown does a very poor job running California,” Trump said. “They have the highest taxes in the United States. The place is totally out of control. You have sanctuary cities where you have criminals living.”

Trump’s long-awaited, highly anticipated visit to California did not come without a firestorm of adolescent tweets from state leaders in attempt to retaliate against the president’s claims.

Brown responded by tweeting, “Thanks for the shout-out, @realDonaldTrump. But bridges are still better than walls. And California remains the 6th largest economy in the world and the most prosperous state in America. #Facts”

#Facts or not, Trump still claims that political leaders in California are actually in favor of walls, saying, “The state of California is begging us to build walls in certain areas, they don’t tell you that.”

Lieutenant Governor Gavin Newsom responded with a tweet of his own: “California is not "begging" you for this wall. Your wall is a waste of money and is literally impossible to complete. It will look more like a piece of swiss cheese than an insurmountable barrier. It's nothing more than a 6th century solution to a 21st century problem.”

Despite all of the animosity, Trump’s visit to California lasted just one day. After spending time inspecting wall prototypes built to his specs, he later spoke at the Marine Corps Air Station Miramar before traveling to a Beverly Hills fundraiser that was expected to raise $5 million for the Republican National Committee.

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